Welcome to Process-info.org library

Process-info.org is an online library of Computer Operating System's Processes, which helps you to identify processes running at background of computer operating system or at remote computers on your network.

Process-info.org contains a growing database of executable processes (mostly with .EXE extension) and DLL libraries. You can search for processes through search box or navigate alphabeticaly by starting letter of process name.

It is assumed that users are familiar with computer operating system they're using and agree with suggested changes. Process-info.org will not be held responsible, if changes you make cause a system failure.

The Latest News

15 latest global news related to computer security

October 21, 2014 3:09:10 AM CEST

Rootkit:W32/ZAccess – Rootkit:W32/ZAccess constantly displays advertisements on the infected machine and may silently contact remote servers to retrieve additional advertising information.

 

October 21, 2014 3:09:10 AM CEST

Trojan-Spy:W32/FinSpy.A – Trojan-Spy:W32/FinSpy.A is a component of a commercial surveillance product that monitors user activity.

 

October 20, 2014 11:25:21 PM CEST

Apple Releases Security Updates for iOS and Apple TV – Original release date: October 20, 2014 Apple has released security updates for iOS devices and Apple TV to address multiple vulnerabilities, one of which could allow an attacker to decrypt data protected by SSL.Updates available include:iOS 8.1 for iPhone 4s and later, iPod touch 5th generation and later, and iPad 2 and laterApple TV 7.0.1 for Apple TV 3rd generation and laterUsers and administrators are encouraged to review Apple security updates HT6541 and HT6542, and apply the necessary updates. This product is provided subject to this Notification and this Privacy & Use policy.

 

October 20, 2014 5:11:00 PM CEST

Researcher creates proof-of-concept worm for network-attached storage devices – Network-attached storage (NAS) devices are riddled with vulnerabilities that can put the security of sensitive data and networks at risk, a researcher has found. To prove his point, he has created a proof-of-concept worm that can infect devices from three different manufacturers.Earlier this year, Jacob Holcomb, a security analyst at Baltimore-based firm Independent Security Evaluators, started researching the security of NAS devices. He selected popular devices from 10 manufacturers and found that they were all were susceptible to root compromise. In addition, he found that exploiting half of them did not require authentication.The tested devices were: Asustor AS-602T, TRENDnet TN-200 and TN-200T1, QNAP TS-870, Seagate BlackArmor 1BW5A3-570, Netgear ReadyNAS104, D-LINK DNS-345, Lenovo IX4-300D, Buffalo TeraStation 5600, Western Digital MyCloud EX4 and ZyXEL NSA325 v2.During a presentation last week at the Black Hat Europe security conference in Amsterdam, Holcomb demonstrated a proof-of-concept worm that can automatically infect the D-LINK DNS-345, TRENDnet TN-200/TN-200T1 and Western Digital MyCloud EX4 devices by exploiting command injection and authentication bypass vulnerabilities, which as far as he knows, are still unpatched.Holcomb's worm can scan predefined ranges of IP (Internet Protocol) addresses to find devices that respond over TCP port 80 and match certain digital fingerprints associated with the targeted NAS devices. Once it identifies a vulnerable device, the worm launches the necessary exploit to obtain root access and installs an interactive shell. It then downloads and runs a binary copy of itself and begins scanning from the new device.Holcomb has not released the worm's code publicly, but plans to do so in the future after the affected vendors patch the vulnerabilities and users have a chance to upgrade. His demonstration was intended to show that creating self-propagating malware for NAS devices is relatively easy, because many of these systems share the same architecture and even code that was provided by chipset vendors.Furthermore, some manufacturers reuse code across entire product lines, so one vulnerability found in a low-end consumer NAS device can also be present in expensive, enterprise-grade devices from the same manufacturer, according to Holcomb. When it comes to NAS devices, paying more does not necessarily mean better security, he said.While Holcomb's proof-of-concept worm did nothing more than propagate within a local area network, attackers could create similar malware to compromise NAS devices that are accessible from the Internet and use them for performing distributed denial-of-service (DDoS) attacks and other malicious activities.These are quite powerful devices with a lot of storage capacity, so they present many opportunities for abuse, Holcomb said.Cases of large-scale exploitation of NAS devices have already been seen in the wild. Researchers from Dell SecureWorks reported in June that a hacker made over US$600,000 after hacking into Synology NAS devices and using them to mine Dogecoin, a type of cryptocurrency.In August, some Synology NAS device owners reported that their systems had been infected by a malware program called SynoLocker that encrypted their personal files and held them to ransom.A compromised NAS device could also serve as a pivot point inside the local network to attack other systems, so they wouldn't necessarily have to be compromised from the Internet. Attackers could create Windows malware that scans the local network for vulnerable NAS devices and infects them.Such compromises would be hard to detect because there are no antivirus or security products running on NAS devices. The compromises would allow attackers to maintain a foothold in the network even if the original Windows malware is later removed.

 

October 20, 2014 4:03:18 PM CEST

VU#577193: POODLE vulnerability in SSL 3.0 – Many modern TLS clients can fall back to version 3.0 of the SSL protocol,which is vulnerable to a padding-oracle attack when Cypher-block chaining(CBC)mode is used. This is commonly referred to as the"POODLE"(Padding Oracle On Downgraded Legacy Encryption)attack.

 

October 20, 2014 12:43:21 PM CEST

Smart Lock Devices: Security Risks and Opportunities – Security is one of the top concerns when consumers consider buying smart devices. With cybercrime making the headlines every day, one has to think: is this smart device vulnerable to cyber attacks? Are these technologies secure enough for us to rely on them in our everyday lives? A good example of a technology that we need […]Post from: Trendlabs Security Intelligence Blog - by Trend MicroSmart Lock Devices: Security Risks and Opportunities

 

October 20, 2014 11:37:00 AM CEST

Apple's iCloud targeted in man-in-the-middle attack in China – Following the iPhone 6 launch in China, Apple's iCloud service began facing a "man-in-the-middle" style attack in the country, in an apparent attempt to steal username and password information, according to an anti-censorship watchdog group.As of Monday, the attack was still ongoing, said GreatFire.org, which began noticing two days before that certain connections made to Apple's iCloud site in China were no longer responding with a trusted digital certificate, putting them at risk of decryption.Man-in-the-middle attacks eavesdrop on communications by pretending to each party to be the one at the other end. The attacker will trick victims into believing they are visiting a site over a secure connection, when in fact all communications are being monitored."This is clearly a malicious attack on Apple in an effort to gain access to usernames and passwords and consequently all data stored on iCloud," wrote GreatFire.org in a Monday posting.The group, which monitors China's censorship practices, alleges that government authorities are behind the attack. Other man-in-the-middle style attacks have hit Google, Microsoft and Github earlier this year in China, GreatFire.org added.Yahoo was another recent victim. Since late September, connections made from China to the company's site have also been at risk, and vulnerable to eavesdropping. Such attacks are probably made so that Chinese authorities can monitor and block content users in the country are trying to access, said Swedish security firm Netresec, in a posting earlier this month.Both Apple and Yahoo did not immediately respond to a request for comment.Apple's iPhone 6 launched on Friday in mainland China, but not before government regulators demanded that security changes be made to the iOS software.Months prior, Chinese state media alleged that the software could be used to secretly spy on iPhone users through its "Frequent Locations" feature. Apple later denied the claims.

 

October 20, 2014 6:24:00 AM CEST

Bleach Ebola Cure Hoax – Circulating social media message claims that drinking or injecting household bleach will cure Ebola and stop you from becoming infected.

 

October 20, 2014 4:35:52 AM CEST

An Analysis of A Windows Kernel-Mode Vulnerability (CVE-2014-4113) – Three zero-day vulnerabilities - CVE-2014-4114, CVE-2014-4148, and CVE-2014-4113 - were reported last week and patched by Microsoft in their October 2014 Patch Tuesday. CVE-2014-4114, also known as the Sandworm vulnerability, can enable attackers to easily craft malware payloads when exploited. This particular vulnerability has been linked to targeted attacks against European sectors and industries. In addition, our researchers found that […]Post from: Trendlabs Security Intelligence Blog - by Trend MicroAn Analysis of A Windows Kernel-Mode Vulnerability (CVE-2014-4113)

 

October 20, 2014 3:14:00 AM CEST

China again blames US for disrupted cybersecurity talks – China claimed on Sunday the U.S. has derailed cybersecurity cooperation between the two countries and that it doesn't tolerate hacking.The statement came a day after Yang Jiechi, a state councilor who deals with foreign affairs, held discussions on Saturday in Boston with U.S. Secretary of State John Kerry on topics that included cybersecurity."Dialogue and cooperation between China and the U.S. in the field of cybersecurity is faced with difficulty due to the wrong actions taken by the American side," according to a statement on China's Ministry of Foreign Affairs website.Jiechi told Kerry that "China firmly opposes and cracks down on all forms of hacker attacks," it said.In an unprecedented move, the U.S. Justice Department in May charged five members of the People's Liberation Army with stealing trade secrets from U.S. companies. It marked the first-ever U.S. criminal charges related to suspected state-sponsored hacking.The indictment alleged the men belonged to Unit 61398 of the Chinese Army in Shanghai, which lead an eight-year hacking spree that stole intellectual property from companies including Westinghouse Electric, United States Steel and subsidiaries of SolarWorld, among other companies.The documents included photos, such as that of Wang Dong, who allegedly went by the nickname "UglyGorilla" and Sun Kailiang, who is wearing a military uniform.The trade secrets stolen included information about a nuclear power plant design and cost and pricing data from a solar panel company, according to the indictment. China did not refer to the criminal case in its statement on Sunday.The legal action contributed to increasing tension between the two countries, which had been strained since Google accused China-based hackers of stealing its intellectual property in early 2010.Google said it was one of more than 20 large companies struck by a cyberespionage campaign dubbed Operation Aurora by security experts, who contend the group behind those attacks is still active.Send news tips and comments to jeremy_kirk@idg.com. Follow me on Twitter: @jeremy_kirk

 

October 20, 2014 2:00:00 AM CEST

Exp.CVE-2014-0565 – Risk Level: Very Low.

 

October 20, 2014 12:51:00 AM CEST

Dropbox used for convincing phishing attack – Dropbox's file storage service was used for a tricky phishing attack, although the service was quick to shut down it down, according to Symantec.The security vendor said it detected a batch of phishing emails advising recipients that they've been sent a large file and included a link to Dropbox-hosted page."The email claims the document can be viewed by clicking on the link included in the message," wrote Nick Johnston of Symantec in a blog post. "However, the link opens a fake Dropbox login page, hosted on Dropbox itself."By hosting the fake login page on Dropbox, the scammers gain some benefits over hosting it on a random, strange-looking domain name. The phishing page is contained within Dropbox's user content domain, similar to shared photos or files, Johnston wrote.Most of the phishing page's elements are also served over SSL (Secure Sockets Layer), which encrypts communication between a client and a server and makes the ruse look more convincing. Older browsers may not prompt a warning if SSL isn't used for the entire page, he wrote."The prominence of the warning varies from browser to browser; some browsers simply change the padlock symbol shown in the address bar, whereas others include a small banner at the top of the page," Johnston wrote. "Users may not notice or understand these security warnings or the associated implications."Phishing attacks have often been staged on trusted domains for file storage and sharing, such as on Google's Docs and Drive services.The phishing page, which was quickly taken down by Dropbox, asks for a user's Dropbox credentials but also includes logos for popular webmail services. It purports to allow people to use the same webmail credentials to log into Dropbox.Once a set of credentials has been collected, a PHP script within phishing page simply redirects to Dropbox's actual login page, Johnston wrote.Send news tips and comments to jeremy_kirk@idg.com. Follow me on Twitter: @jeremy_kirk

 

October 19, 2014 5:22:00 PM CEST

Tor-based anonymizing router gets pulled from Kickstarter for rules violations – Anonabox, a piece of home networking equipment designed to allow you to connect to the Internet anonymously, had raised nearly $600,000 in pledges on Kickstarter--blowing its $7500 goal out of the water. But on Friday, Kickstarter suspended the project, according to Ars Technica. Wired reports that Kickstarter put a stop to the project because it felt that August Germar, the creator of the Anonabox, misled contributors when he stated that he built all the hardware himself--a violation of Kickstarter's rules.According to Wired, Kickstarter users pointed out that Chinese manufacturers produced similar hardware, and Germar later confirmed to the publication that he had used off-the-shelf components to build the Anonabox, but had made some adjustments to the hardware.The story behind the story: Privacy advocates generally love Tor, and it's a boon to those who are concerned about government tracking operations. Governments generally don't seem to be as keen on it, as criminals sometimes use it to carry out illicit activities. In July, the Russian government actually offered a cash reward to anyone who uncovered Tor users.Low-cost anonymityThe device would've cost $51, as our Jared Newman pointed out. You would plug it into your router, and it would send all your Internet traffic through the Tor network, which anonymizes you and effectively erases your online "footprints" that you would otherwise leave behind. Other network accessories achieve similar results, but some of them require a fair amount of technical know-how in order to assemble and use. If Anonabox's Kickstarter success is any indication, though, there's plenty of widespread interest in online anonymity, and it's probably safe to assume that we'll see plenty of similar devices in the future.

 

October 19, 2014 2:00:00 AM CEST

Trojan.Cryptdef!gm – Risk Level: Very Low. Type: Trojan.

 

October 19, 2014 2:00:00 AM CEST

OSX.Ventir – Risk Level: Very Low. Type: Trojan.

 
 
 

Navigate through library of processes alphabeticaly by first letter: